Category Archives: Writing Tips

First Five Pages — Tips And Techniques

Some great tips! Come check out what author Joanne Wadsworth has to say on her blog!

Joanne Wadsworth

Random picture alert! Well, kinda.

cat not amused

Do you feel the cat’s conflict? The little mouse on his ear, I’m sure, went flying one second after this photo was taken. Anyway, keep reading, and check out exactly how we as writers, can create tension and conflict in our first five pages, thereby drawing the reader in. (Sorry about the “thereby.” I’m writing historical romance at the moment, and you might find the odd “aged” word appearing within the passages below.) *chuckles* 

Greetings my fellow writersHey everyone,

As writers we sometimes struggle with how our story should begin. We want to craft our first few pages in a way that draws the reader in. The last thing we want is for them to set our book down, to forget it, or to never pick it up again. So here, I’ve compiled a list of techniques to aid the writer in crafting a strong first five…

View original post 487 more words


Creative Writing Tip: Make Sure Your Plot Has Action of a Type to Meet Genre Expectations

Now here is a great thing to keep in mind! Does your writing fit into genre expectations? Come read what Victoria Grefer has to say on the blog Creative Writing with the Crimson League! I found the article VERY interesting!

Creative Writing with the Crimson League

Today I’m continuing with a series of posts I’m writing to explore the four reasons I had to abandon a novel in progress after 100 pages and rework plot, setting, and character to get things going. This post will focus specifically on plot, genre, action, and creating the right kind of tension.

My hope is that this series of posts will, first of all, maybe help someone avoid the trap I fell into (even though I had a happy ending and am releasing the novel in question on Friday. It’s book III of my Herezoth trilogy, called The King’s Sons.)

Secondly, I hope to encourage those who, possibly, are in the process of rewriting or considering rewriting. You aren’t alone or a failure, and yes, you can write. Having to rewrite doesn’t prove the contrary.

Today, we’re on number 3 on the list: one reason I started my novel…

View original post 770 more words


Editing Tips

A great piece on editing by henrymclaughlin on WordServe Water Cooler! Make sure to check out their other great entries!

WordServe Water Cooler

 Books aren’t written, they’re rewritten. Including your own. It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn’t quite done it… Michael Crichton

The workshop leader looked over the group—a motley crew of aspiring and published authors seeking to learn. She arched her eyebrow and said, “The purpose of your first draft is to get the crap out. Then you can go back and write the book.” Okay, I thought, that’s an interesting way to look at it. And it actually freed me to write better.

I’ve also learned that each draft has crap in it. The goal is to have less and less in each revision. Even today, I’ll pick up my published novel, Journey to Riverbend, and see things I would change. And the published version is the eighth draft.

ScissorsOver the years, people have asked me, “What’s the best way to…

View original post 312 more words


Writer Tools – Shovel

Found this piece to be very interesting and worth sharing with my readers! “Writer Tools – Shovel” by Tyroper on the blog “Time to Write”

Time to Write

 

 

 

Sometimes I’m digging for meaning in my novel, and all I am finding is dirt, pebbles and lumps of clay. Sure I could take the clay, wash it, add a bunch together with a bit of water, and create a “David” statue replica. But that would be a side-route, a false meaning. My book doesn’t have anything to do with the statue of David. Of course, I am a writer and not a sculptpr, so my play with clay resembles a ball. Sculptures are pretty, but I want to pin some meaning on the tail of my plotkey. HeeHaw.

At times I get so enamored with the hole I am digging, and the straight and smooth sides, that I forget I am actually looking for something in the hole. But, those sides are pretty awesome, right? This hole is ready for a citrus tree…

View original post 125 more words


The Best-Selling Books from January-March 2013

This was a good read. Brought to you by Writers Write


Point of View: Reblogged

Point of View is important, and this is a great entry about it!

Michelle Proulx - Author

Plots and characters are undoubtedly important things to consider when writing a novel. I would argue, however, that POV is even more crucial. This is because if you screw up the POV, no one will even think about reading your book, regardless of how great the plot or characters are.

I’ll prove my point. Read the following paragraph:

You walk toward me, hips swaying as your silky black stilettos clack on the marble tiles. Bradley sits casually at the bar, considering what to say to the beautiful woman approaching him. She’s way too good for him, thinks the bartender. I eat up the luscious man lounging at the bar with my eyes. “What can I get you?” asks the bartender.

Has your brain exploded yet? That’s because of all the shifting POVs. For the record, the POVs in that paragraph went as follows: second-person → third-person → first-person → third-person. Ack, I…

View original post 843 more words


Total Submergence

Purely inspirational! When you think you can’t do it, take a breath and remember that you can!

Insanity

There are times when we dive underwater to explore what rests below; to discover what can be found at such great depths within ourself. And then there are times when we go under not from our own choosing, but because something forced us under; our fingers slipped, and without premeditation, we suddenly let go.

I’ve found that almost all of my answers can be found from looking within. Some answers I placed there years ago. Others surprise me with their appearance. Memories dwell inside us like colorful coral reefs. And when the time is right we swim gently around every outcropping, allowing ourselves to live in the memory.

If one is prepared to be underwater, then it is a place of beautiful exploration. Downed ships still retain some of their prior glory, even when shrouded in loss. But it is when we are there without oxygen; when we wake in…

View original post 500 more words


Some information from a good friend of mine! Important for all those looking to “brand” themselves! This applies to all you writers, bloggers, editors and publishers out there! Brought to you by my lovely friend, Kelly Johnson at http://kellyjpro.wordpress.com/


Social media and stalking; are you doing it wrong?

Do you know the difference? I think this is great! Brought to you from laurenswrittenword

Lauren K. McKellar

It’s come to my attention that there’s a lot of buzz about the correct and incorrect ways to use social media when promoting yourself as an author or blogger. There’s a fine line between effective social media use and, well, just plain stalking. For those of you who worry you may be falling into the latter category, here’s my all-important, 100 percent certified* checklist for you to make sure you’re on the path of the straight and narrow:

Strong social media use: Following people on twitter such as authors or industry professionals.

Stalker: Following those people home.

Strong social media use: Sending a note to an author or industry professional once you’ve added them, just to say hi.

Stalker: Writing the hello letter in blood. The blood of their dead cat.

Strong social media use: Sharing the statuses and updates of these people IF you find them relevant and informative.

View original post 134 more words


How to Edit out Crap from your Manuscript

Who else finds editing a pain? I know I do! Specially with my own work! But these are some great tips and tricks! Brought to you by NovelGirl!